Archive | Contemporary Scandi

Paper magic by Örsjö

The annual furniture fair in Milan is up and running and the Scandi brands are well represented. Among the many Swedish Örsjö stands out with the Virvel collection by Ingegerd Råman. The simplistic design, beautiful handcrafted paper from Lessebo and soft functional light make Virvel an instant classic. Paper shades have not been common in Sweden due to the risk of fire, but with LED there’s new possibilites to use paper for lamps. If in Milan you can visit Örsjö at Euroluce, pavilion 13/F15.

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Virvel lamp with paper shade, by Ingegerd Råman for Örsjö (2019). Photo copyright Erik Lefvander/Örsjö.

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Örsjö is known for their collaborations with skilled Swedish designers. The 2019 collection is no exception. From left to right: Skyline by Folkform, white enamel or polished brass, Vinge by Note Design Studio, enamelled frame with dimmer handle in solid brass or enamelled metal, Streck by Joel Karlsson, adjustable shade made of opal blown glass, switch inside shade, textile cord, Libreria by Folkform, powdercoated steel and opal glass, Kvist by Jonas Bohlin, silver welded contruction, hook designed for wrapping cord, and Libreria floor by Folkform, powdercoated steel and opaque glass. Photo copyright Erik Lefvander/Örsjö.

Architectual moves, Contemporary Scandi, Eco Aesthetics, Environmental friendly, Fab Swedes 2019-04-10

Heav(enl)y Metal!

Aluminium is everyone’s choice 2019 and Swedish brands knows how to combine fab design with this sustainable metal. The alu trend started some years ago with the ingenious designs by Signe Persson-Melin for Byarums bruk. The designer (born in 1925) was invited by the company (until then a traditional metal industry) to create contemporary objects for the garden. With her knowledge of form and function Signe Persson-Melin revitalized the whole collection. Gråsippa, Pokal and Palissad soon became role models for sustainable form + sustainable production. Byarums bruk use recycled Swedish aluminium. Their planters can be used all year round, as aluminium is resistent to both heat and cold.

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Gråsippa planter by Signe Persson-Melin for Byarums bruk. Recycled raw cast aluminium. Photo copyright Byarums bruk.

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Pokal planter by Signe Persson-Melin for Byarums bruk. Recycled raw cast aluminium. Photo copyright Byarums bruk.

 

Another stylish product in cast aluminium is the Museum display shelf, by TAF for the new interior of Nationalmuseum – the Swedish National Gallery. In production by String Furniture.

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Museum display shelf by TAF for String Furniture (2018). Photo copyright String Furniture.

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Even though the brand works in virgin aluminium, recycled might be an opition in the future, says Victoria Friis from String Furniture. Meanwhile String Furniture collaborate with a chinese manufacturer who’s following the Swedish certification standard ”Möbelfakta” which ensures sustainable quality for metal products, environmental sustainability and social responsibility. The products by String Furniture comes in an paper package made in Sweden, following FTI guidelines and standards FSC, ISO22000, ISO9001 and ISO14001.

String Furniture also produce the classic work by Kajsa and Nisse Strinning. Namely the ”string shelf”, a piece of iconic furniture well-known and loved by Swedes since the 50s. Very few designers have made such an impact on Swedish interior decoration as the Strinning couple. Recently String Furniture launched several developments, in collaboration with some of Sweden’s best industrial designers and stylists.

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String Furniture Beige is an update of the String indoor shelving system, with a new beige coating chosen by interior stylist Lotta Agaton (2019).

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String Outdoor, by Kajsa and Nisse Strinning (panels) and Anna von Schewen/Björn Dahlström (shelves) for String (2019). Aluzinc, steel coated with rust resistant aluminium-zinc (shelves) and hot-dip galvanized metal string (panels). Made in Sweden. Photo copyright String Furniture.

Architectual moves, Contemporary Scandi, Eco Aesthetics, Environmental friendly, Fab Swedes, Signe Persson Melin, TAF 2019-04-03

The Craft Industry

Let’s take a look at three Swedish brands, operating in the field of craft, design and sustainability. During the Stockholm Design Week in February 2019 the owners of Iris Hantverk, Larsson korgmakare and Växbo Lin met at Svensk Hemslöjd and discussed their visions for a sustainable future and obstacles they might have to handle.

Sara Edhäll from Iris Hantverk spoke of their longtime work with visually impaired craftsmen and the importance of introducing contemporary design to the traditional concept of brush binding. Some of the models has been in the loop since 1870 when the company started. But a traditional model may come out of fashion due to lifestyle changes. By collaborating with industrial designers it’s been possible to develop attractive contemporary products within the limits of traditional brush binding. As the brushes and objects are handmade and of high quality natural materials, the production is expensive. ”Our brushes are popular”, Sara Edhäll says, ”but it is difficult to communicate to the customer why the price is higher. The well known traditional dishbrush is an example, it costs ten times more than a massproduced plastic dishbrush but it’ll last several years and you can recycle it, or put it in the compost”. Iris Hantverk also face difficulties finding craftsmen; today 6 craftsmen from different countries work together in the Stockholm factory. When a large order is placed Iris Hantverk collaborate with a similar craft industry in Estonia. Iris Hantverk has got two shops in Stockholm where they sell their own collection of brushes and everyday items as well as selected things for sustainable living.

iris-hantverk-skaggkamStylish product for the contemporary man: Beard comb by Lovisa Wattman. Linseed oiled walnut and stainless Swedish steel (with sandblasted surface). Also suitable for combing mustache. Size 7 x 7 x 1 cm. Photo copyright Iris Hantverk.

Hanna Bruce from Växbo Lin told about the importance of design skills in the making of linen products for contemporary living. ”The young generation is interested in a beautiful table cloth or towel but not one you have to mangle. So we asked textile designer Ingela Berntsson to develop a series of table cloths and towels you can machine wash and just let dry and they’ll still look fab”. A linen towel is for life, it is almost impossible to wear out, absorbs water much better than cotton and is possible to recycle or compost. Växbo Lin recently decided to ditch bleech for all their warps. As a result the whole collection had to be updated. Jacob Bruce added that while Växbo Lin work with a contemporary design they continue to produce the traditional linen products to keep the heritage of patterns alive. ”But today our main concern is to develop sustainable products for the young generation of customers looking for a contemporary function and feel.” During several years there’s been a lack of qualitative, organic flax for sale on the market and Jacob and Hanna Bruce put in a lot of time searching for it. ”We have the mill, we have the knowledge of sustainable linen production and we’ve got functional designs. But we’re dependent on buying our material from abroad. We’d love to see a production of flax in Sweden!”.

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Bubbel towel by Ingela Berntsson for Växbo Lin. 100 % linen made in Sweden. Photo copyright Växbo Lin.

Erica Larsson from Larsson korgmakare is the only maker of rattan furniture in Sweden. Well known as the maker of Josef Frank’s models for Svensk Tenn and the designs by Matti Klenell and Carina Seth Andersson for the restored National Museum. Larsson korgmakare also make their own collection of chairs, stools and tables in designs from 1930s to 1960s. An important part of todays business is the restoring of old furniture, from antique cane and rattan pieces to classic Scandi furniture. ”There’s a lot of beautiful handmade furniture put away in attics and secondhand shops because they’re slightly broken or a bit old fashioned. But with a growing awareness of climate change and how secondhand might be a sustainable option, people, especially the younger generation, bring them to us to be renovated”, says Erica Larsson.”It is often easy to make a chair useful again, with a new weaved seating or change of week parts. An old piece of furniture often have a patina and charm you don’t get with the new”. For this small craft industry the lack of material is an never ending challenge: ”We always look for certified rattan, grown with the rubber plant in controlled farming. This to help prevent deforesting in the countries where it grows”.

Larsson korgmakare Photo Johan Sellén Styling Cia Wedin

Badhusstolen 230 by John Larsson for Larsson korgmakare (1940). Blanket by Pia Wallén. From an editorial piece by Cia Wedin. Photo copyright Johan Sellén.

Contemporary Scandi, Eco Aesthetics, Environmental friendly, Fab Swedes, Iris Hantverk, Larsson korgmakare 2019-03-06

Climate challenge: Home Holiday

Yes thank you, the holiday was fine. We stayed at home, unplugged the internet, read lots of books and used up the stock of candles, wine, green tea and chocolate biscuits. To slow down is to find joyful moments in the everyday, in the ordinary. When you’re free to linger in life, a walk in the neighbourhood becomes as exciting as any visit to a foreign destiny. After the 2019 Sportlov – this fab annual holiday in Sweden when children and adults are supposed to go skiing, skate and spend time together, we’re ready for the next climate challenge:  ”H and W” as in Home Weekend! Stay tuned!

NB ”Sportlov” was introduced in Sweden in 1940 as a means to reduce the amount of coal used to heating up the school buildings. All children got a week off school and the government arranged ”activites to improve the health of young adults”. Among the promoted activites was skiing in the mountains. With climate change the Sportlov is as important as ever.

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If your’re lucky to visit the Swedish mountains during wintertime you might spot the small Arctic Fox. The project Felles Fjellrev is a collaboration between Sweden, Norway and Finland with the goal to save the Arctic Fox. Photo copyright Thomas Meijer.

Animal Rights, Contemporary Scandi, Environmental friendly, Fab Swedes, In the Season, Scandimood 2019-03-06

Falling

…through days and nights as the Stockholm Design Week has been up and running. Good thing is the Scandi design world definitely aim on sustainability. Not as a trend, but as a real concern about climate change. Several brands did slow down and did not exhibit, others did but added ideas and discussions on sustainability to the concept. Some chose to work with developments in existing collections instead of presenting news.

The work to create sustainability in the design world has barely started and it’s gonna take some time before we touch firm ground. Where we’ll end up is hard to tell but one thing is clear: the industry must reconsider its position as ”designer of the future”, and speed up the way to produce, sell, use and recycle design in a sustainable way. Talking is good but action is needed.

Here’s some highlights from the Stockholm Design Week and Stockholm Furniture & Light Fair 2019:

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w102 chipperfield (the extended family) by David Chipperfield for Wästberg (2019). Solid brass, dimmable, energy class A+. Photo copyright Wästberg.

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w102 chipperfield (the extended family) for Wästberg (2019), sketch by designer/architect David Chipperfield. Photo copyright David Chipperfield.

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Bespoke and locally produced by gifted craftsmen: here a modern kitchen (2019) in a historical building. Cabinets in dark stained oak, top in Kinnekulle limestone and an asymmetric shelf. Photo copyright Nordiska kök.

 

fileSuspence pendant by GamFratesi for Fritz Hansen .The new colour Pale Pearl lends a soft egg-shell quality to the minimalistic classic. Photo copyright Fritz Hansen.

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Iittala. Jasper Morrison. Raami. A fine exhibition about finding joy in the simplistic but qualitative every day. Photo copyright Iittala.

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Baux Pulp Acoustic Panel by Form Us With Love for Baux (2019). The patterns are inspired by origami and the 100% bio based product comes in colouring created by using different amounts of natural wheat in the material. The panel is the first in the world to uncompromisingly combine high-performance properties of sound absorption, safety, and durability with modern aesthetics and sustainability. Cradle-to-cradle at its best! Photo copyright Baux.

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Asplund curated a small, intimate exhibition in their shop at Sibyllegatan in Stockholm and told the story of their cabinet Snow, designed by Jonas Bohlin and Thomas Sandell in 1994. The cabinet celebrates 25 years and the producer has made several important developments to turn it into a Scandi sustainability icon. For the anniversary Snow comes in the colour pale pink. Photo copyright Asplund.

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Avavick stool by Katja Pettersson for the recently restored Nationalmuseum in  Stockholm. Produced by Swedese. Avavick has its name from a dialect from Storuman in the north of Sweden, and it means ”top heavy”. The expression with a weighty seat and delicate legs is fab! Photo copyright Nationalmuseum.

Architectual moves, Asplund, Compassionates, Contemporary Scandi, Eco Aesthetics, Environmental friendly, Fab Swedes, Form Us With Love, Iittala, Louise Campbell, Wästberg 2019-02-14

Exhibition at Stockholm Design Week

The exhibition ”Mellan handen och ögat” is up and running at fab Svensk Hemslöjd in Stockholm. More than 60 producers present new and old work. If in Stockholm come and experience handicraft and craft in a design context! Produced and curated by Cia Wedin in collaboration with Jenny Berge/Svensk Hemslöjd.

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Stitch carpet by Pia Wallén for Asplund Collection, Ticka Bowls by Jennie Adén. Styling Cia Wedin. Photo copyright Anna Kern/Svensk Hemslöjd.

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Flooring Elements by Bolon, Bowl table by Andreas Engesvik for Fogia, wool and mittens from Svensk Hemslöjd. Styling Cia Wedin. Photo copyright Anna Kern/Svensk Hemslöjd.

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Deer by Gunnar Johnsson and Dalahorse by Nils Olsson. Styling Cia Wedin. Photo copyright Anna Kern/Svensk Hemslöjd.

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Bowl by Åke Landström, Spoon by Andreas Heurlin, table cloth Våga by Växbo Lin. Styling Cia Wedin. Photo copyright Anna Kern/Svensk Hemslöjd.

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Bolsterkudde cushion från Klässbols, Kranium wooden skull by Acne JR. Styling Cia Wedin. Photo copyright Anna Kern/Svensk Hemslöjd.

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Ekblad cushion by Maria Åström, Stockholm No 1 chair by Larsson korgmakare, flooring Elements by Bolon, Book socle by Jessica Signell Knutsson. Styling Cia Wedin. Photo copyright Anna Kern/Svensk Hemslöjd.

Andreas Engesvik, Anna Kern, Asplund, Bolon, Broberg & Ridderstråle, Bruno Mathsson, Calle Forsberg, Carina Seth Andersson, Compassionates, Contemporary Scandi, Eco Aesthetics, Environmental friendly, Fab Swedes, Fogia, Friends, Ikea, In the Season, Iris Hantverk, Maria Åström, Pia Wallén, Scandimood, Signe Persson Melin, Wästberg 2019-02-04

Mellan handen och ögat

If in Stockholm during the Stockholm Design Week 2019 you’re much welcome to visit a production of mine called ”Mellan handen och ögat” (Between the hand and the eye). It’s an exhibition + seminars + open studio programme on sustainability as it present itself when handicraft, craft and design meet and mingle! The ”Mellan handen och ögat” exhibition is a house-story…live…and it takes place at fab Svensk Hemslöjd. App. 60 of Sweden’s best craftspeople and designers participate, with everyday objects and furniture. The organisation Svensk Hemslöjd was founded in 1899 by textile artist Lilli Zickerman and the Swedish Prince Eugen. More information will soon be available at www.svenskhemslojd.com

Mellan handen och ögat exhibition poster by Anna Larsson Design_LR”Mellan handen och ögat” exhibition poster, by Anna Larsson Design (2019). Printed by Göteborgstryckeriet. Certified with Svanen.

Architectual moves, Book Cradle, Compassionates, Contemporary Scandi, Eco Aesthetics, Environmental friendly, Fab Swedes, Friends, In the Season, Scandimood 2019-01-26

Jasper Morrisons’ Frame of Life

Raami (frame in Finnish) is a new dining collection designed by Jasper Morrison for Iittala (2019). In the design process Morrison focused on the concept of atmosphere. He investigated how the way objects are used or handled (part from functionality and their visual qualities) have an impact on the atmosphere surrounding a meal. ”Objects that contribute the best atmosphere tend to be less immediately noticeable; it may take some time before you appreciate them for their practicality and more subtle, discreet presence”, says Morrison. ”That’s because the balance of how they look and how they perform is correct, they have been designed to perform well and contribute the right atmosphere, not just to catch the eye.” I agree on that. And who is better suited than Jasper Morrison to design a minimalistic, basic yet interesting collection where a few but well designed items in as disparate materials as ceramic, glass and wood perform very nicely together. Or with other pieces you may already have in your home. Or will find in the future… Raami is a contemporary collection with potential to become a classic.

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Raami dining collection by Jasper Morrison for Iittala (2019). Painting by Nathalie Du Pasquier. Photo copyright Iittala.

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Raami tumbler by Jasper Morrison for Iittala (2009) comes in colours Clear, Moss Green and Sea Blue. The plate comes in a soft white colour. Photo copyright Iittala.

Iittala_2019_Raami_18_JPGRaami glass by Jasper Morrison for Iittala (2009) is a small, rather sturdy and heavy glass on foot. For sparkling, white, red wine or apretif. Photo copyright Iittala.

Compassionates, Contemporary Scandi, Eco Aesthetics, Iittala 2018-11-20

Office of tomorrow

Several Scandi brands attended Orgatec 2018 – the international fair in Cologne where furniture for the contemporary and future office space were on display. Swedish Wästberg exhibited as partner to Vitra within their ”Work Concept” space. And launched lighting with a high-tech, minimalistic and environmental friendly design. When the traditional office space and interior is under change, the Scandi brands establish a conceptual take on the office: Wästberg use form and function to bring lighting to a level where the lamp is not a fixed structure but a multifunctional nice obejct you may bring with you into different spaces over time.

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w182pastille by Sam Hecht and Kim Colin/ Industrial Facility for Wästberg (2018). Bio-polyamide based on 60% biologically and recycable material from the castor plant. Dimmable from a single LED rather than an array, which reduces heat as well as energy use. This is achieved by reaching a state of equilibrium between its single light source, a large reflector and large diffuser. Photo copyright Wästberg.

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w182pastille has a construction that allows a variety of ‘surfaces’ to be illuminated. Different to task lamps that illuminate in a focused way; or table and pendant lamps that provide ambient light, the lamp sees environments as surfaces to softly illuminate. The w182 pastille is able to freely articulate between surfaces by rotating up, down and around. Photo copyright Wästberg.

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w182pastille by Sam Hecht and Kim Colin for Wästberg (2018). Comes in colours Oxide Red, Olive Green, Soft White and Graphite Black. Photo copyright Wästberg.

Architectual moves, Contemporary Scandi, Eco Aesthetics, Fab Swedes, Wästberg 2018-11-07

The unfolding of beauty…

It’s time for the amaryllis bulbs to be planted and the hyacinths to go into vases. In app. 6 weeks from now the graceful flowers will blossom, filling the room with their lovely scent!

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Amaryllis bulbs to be planted in rich soil some six weeks before Christmas. Styling by Cia Wedin- Photo copyright Anna Kern.

Amaryllis white lime

I’ll keep this beauty in mind while following the amaryllis of 2018 while they grow, slowly… into tall and slender…into white and lime…into perfection.

 

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Hyacinth bulbs in Olympia vases by Ingegerd Råman for Skruf. Hats made of Carta Varese paper from Carta Pura. Wooden dear by Gunnar Johnsson for E Torndahl. Styling by Cia Wedin. Photo copyright Anna Kern.

 

Anna Kern, Contemporary Scandi, Eco Aesthetics, Environmental friendly, Fab Swedes, In the Season, Scandimood 2018-11-06

Little Sun Black Diamond

Art + Sustainability is a strong trend and some projects manage to balance an artistic integrity with hard core pragmatism. In 2012 Olafur Eliasson teamed up with engineer Frederik Ottesen and founded Little Sun – a foundation and business, with the aim to bring sun energy to people who have no access to the electrical grid. Since the start more than 650 000 lamps have been sold of the original Little Sun lamp. Last year the team launched Little Sun Diamond, a pocket sized, feather light, solar powered lamp made of biodegenrable plastic. 5 hours charging in the sun gives 5 hours of bright light, fading to a longlasting soft light. Now Little Sun steps up with the release of Little Sun Black Diamond, a special edition in stylish carbon black. For each lamp sold two solar lamps will go to people in an area without reliably access to energy. The campaign runs November 1st until Christmas.

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Little Sun Black Diamond by Olafur Eliasson for Little Sun (2018). Photo copyright Little Sun.

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Five hours charge in the sun gives five hours bright light and then a slowly fade into a soft light over a time period of several hours. Little Sun Black Diamond by Olafur Eliasson for Little Sun (2018). Photo copyright Little Sun.

Compassionates, Contemporary Scandi, Environmental friendly 2018-11-05