Erskines box

One famous Swedish summer dwelling is Ralph Erskines house from 1941–1942. He named it Lådan = The Box. With only 20 squaremetres for himself, his wife Ruth and their two small children, Erskine had to invent space-saving furniture; the bed hung in ropes from the cealing, and doubled as a sofa, the working table folded into the bookshelf and so on. Lådan still stand as an architectual role model in the collective minds of Swedes longing for a simple summer dwelling of their own.

Erskines Lådan Lovön

Photo from the collections of The Swedish Center for Architecture and Design

Lådan was originally built in Lissma, south of Stockholm, as a permanent home. It had no electricity, no running water and no wc. The Erskine family lived 4 years in Lådan, before moving closer to town. Lådan was well-built, but the materials did not survive over time and gradually it subsided into nature. In 1989, under supervision by Erskine, Lådan was rebuilt in Lovön, Stockholm. To visit, contact The Swedish Center for Architecture and Design.

Lådan livingroom

Lådan livingroom with fireplace.
Photo Åke E:son Lindman

Lådan kitchen

Lådan kitchen.
Photo unknown

Lådan livingroom and worktable

Lådan living room and worktable.
Photo Åke E:son Lindman

Erskines låda

Ralph Erskine and child in Lådan.

Erskines Lådan back side

Ralph Erksine stacking wood logs along the outer back wall of Lådan.

Ralph Erskine at his worktable in Lådan

Ralph Erskine at his worktable in Lådan.
Black and white photos from the collections of The Swedish Center for Architecture and Design

 

…and here´s an hommage to The Box by Irene Cámara Ruiz:

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